Category Archives: Sedation Dentistry

Four Factors to Consider Before Taking Your Child to a Sedation Dentist

I’m really struggling with how much I am to blame for not taking my son, Chase, to a sedation dentist. He’s six years old and is a bit fidgety. 3 weeks ago, after an exam, the dentist said Chase had a cavity that needed to be filled.

The dentist offered to do the filling immediately, and I saw no reason to object. Chase seemed a little apprehensive but not overwhelmingly. The dentist asked me to leave the room saying sometimes it helps kids relax when their parents aren’t there. About 15 minutes later, I heard Chase screaming and the dentist began yelling at him. I ran into the room and saw Chase on the floor crying with the dentist standing over him and telling him to get off the floor.

I immediately jumped between the dentist and Chase, took Chase by the arm, and prepared to leave. I didn’t know what had happened, but what I saw and heard didn’t look right. The dentist left without saying anything. Chase was hysterical, so I sat down with him for a moment in the treatment room. One of the assistants came in and explained that Chase had bitten down while the dentist was drilling, his tooth cracked, and now he needs a crown. She gave me a referral to a pediatric dentist and then left. The lady at the checkout desk was pleasant but said nothing about the incident.

I still haven’t taken Chase to a dentist to see if he really needs a crown. He has not complained about the tooth, but he has said that he doesn’t want to return to our dentist. Neither do I.

Although my son hasn’t directly said that he is afraid of going to another dental appointment, I’m now wondering if he should start seeing a sedation dentist Is it possible that I missed signs that Chase has some dental anxiety?  Kyla

Kyla,

Outdoors close-up photo of a mother and children smiling and lying on grass. The dark-haired mother is in the middle, her daughter is pictured left, and her son is on the right; for information on sedation dentistry for children.
Family and pediatric dentists make visits fun for children

Please don’t blame yourself for what happened. If Chase handled dental appointments well in the past, you had no way of knowing how he would react during the most recent appointment.

Normally, kids who have trouble during a dental appointment get quite fidgety long before there is an issue. Ultimately, it was the dentist’s responsibility to assess the situation, and it sounds like he failed and was very unprofessional in handling Chase’s anxiety.

Should  You Take Your Child to a Sedation Dentist?

Below are four considerations:

  1. Results of delaying treatment – Your son should have his tooth examined. Don’t wait until he is in pain, because it could lead to anxiety about going to any dental office. Even routine dental exams should not be delayed due to a child’s anxiety or fear. Delays in treatment can contribute to a buildup of plaque and decay, and treating those issues makes dental appointments even longer.
  2. One step at a time – You may need to gradually help your child get comfortable again, perhaps by taking him for an office tour or consultation the first visit and then an exam on the second visit.
  3. Does the dentist regularly treat children? – Your child might be a good candidate for dental sedation, but if you decide to try it, visit an office, such as a family dentist, that regularly treats children, or visit one that specializes in dental care for children.
  4. There are levels of sedation – The mildest form of sedation, nitrous oxide (laughing gas), might be sufficient to help your child relax. The gas is breathed in during the procedure, and it is quickly reversed with pure oxygen. An experienced sedation dentist can determine which option is best for your child.

This blog is sponsored by Dr. Miranda Lacy, a Plano sedation dentist.

Will the type of sedation dentistry use differ with each specialist for dental implants?

I need sedation dentistry for dental implants. I’m wondering whether I should go to a prosthodontist, an oral surgeon, or a periodontist to place my dental implant. Do these specialists handle sedation dentistry differently? I’m not sure what the difference is between all of these specialists anyway. I normally see a general dentist and he’s a great guy, but I guess he won’t do the actual surgery when placing an implant. He says he always refers patients out to a specialist and that he only does the crown on top. He gave me three different referral sheets and told me I could go to anyone. I didn’t really look at them while I was in the office, but now that I’m home, I see that one specialist is a prosthodontist, another is an oral surgeon, and the last one is a periodontist. How do I know which one to choose, and will each of them be willing to give me sedation dentistry?

My dentist promised to provide sedation when I get the implant crown, but what about the surgery?

Thanks. Malcolm

Malcolm,

Head and shoulders photo of a man and woman lying in a field of flowers, for information on sedation dentistry from Plano TX dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.
Sedation dentistry helps you relax

Great question! Basically, any dentist can do dental implant surgery. And dentists who provide oral surgery offer some level sedation.  From a general dentist who just graduated from dental school to a specialist—all of them can place dental implants. But if you’re going to have extensive work done, you want an expert. Statistically speaking, the doctor’s level of training and experience is the most influential factor in the outcome of dental implants.

Even some general dentists have taken extensive post-graduate training in implantology and are highly qualified to place implants. But your dentist is referring you to a specialist. So how do you choose your specialist, and will he or she be willing to provide sedation dentistry?

Which Levels of Sedation Dentistry Will Be Offered?

Most general dentists often offer nitrous oxide (laughing gas). Specialists offer higher levels of sedation, including oral conscious sedation (anti-anxiety medication in pill form) and I.V. sedation. You can call each specialist’s office and ask what levels of sedation will be offered to you.

Dental Implant Specialists Who Offer Sedation

Oral Surgeon

After finishing dental school, doctors can begin practicing right away, or they can continue school for several more years to become a specialist in one of the nine specialties recognized by the American Dental Association (ADA). They define the area as:

“Oral and maxillofacial surgery is the specialty of dentistry which includes the diagnosis, surgical and adjunctive treatment of diseases, injuries and defects involving both the functional and esthetic aspects of the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region.”

Periodontist

The ADA defines this area as:

“Periodontics is that specialty of dentistry which encompasses the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases of the supporting and surrounding tissues of the teeth or their substitutes and the maintenance of the health, function and esthetics of these structures and tissues.”

Prosthodontist

From the ADA:

“Prosthodontics is the dental specialty pertaining to the diagnosis, treatment planning, rehabilitation and maintenance of the oral function, comfort, appearance and health of patients with clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth and/or oral and maxillofacial tissues using biocompatible substitutes.”

Which Specialist Should You Choose?

Regardless of which specialist you choose for dental implant surgery, each of them will offer adequate sedation dentistry to relax you and minimize your sensitivity to pain.

Oral surgeon – Oral surgeons are trained to surgically treat diseases, injuries, and defects. In other words, it’s their job to treat damage, trauma, and malfunction. This could include:

  • Cleft palate
  • Jaw trauma
  • Wisdom teeth extraction
  • Dental implant placement

Periodontist – The periodontist description, mentions “teeth or their substitutes” and talks about maintaining health and function. Periodontists typically

  • Periodontal disease
  • Bone loss, including bone grafting
  • Structural problem

Prosthodontist – The description for prosthodontics says, “clinical conditions associated with missing or deficient teeth.” Prosthodontics is an entire specialty for missing tooth replacements, ranging from dentures to dental implants.

Request Consultations

We suggest that you review each dentist’s website to learn about his or her qualifications. Look for the following:

  • Education
  • Years of experience
  • Credentials, including state board certification, fellowship, or mastership in dental implant organizations
  • Published works on implantology
  • Patient testimonials or reviews (some might be published on external sites)

Choose at least two specialists and schedule consultations with each. This gives you an opportunity to ask questions about dental implant placement, as well as your options for sedation dentistry.

 

This blog is sponsored by Plano, TX female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy. Dr. Lacy is a cosmetic dentist who offers sedation dentistry and restores dental implants with lifelike crowns.

 

Is a Craigslist ride to and from my sedation dentistry appointment acceptable transportation?

Head and shoulders photo of a man and woman lying in a field of flowers, for information on sedation dentistry from Plano TX dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.
Sedation dentistry helps you relax, but you need a trustworthy caregiver

I’m supposed to visit a sedation dentist to have a tooth pulled. Apparently, the roots are somewhat curved and the doctor wants me to be sedated for the procedure. I don’t have any friends or family nearby. I usually use a discounted cab service that is available to me because I am disabled. I asked the dentist’s office if that was good enough and they told me no because the person driving me has to go into the office with me.

I thought about using Uber or Lyft and asking the driver to do it, but you never know who you will get, and I’m not sure they’ll do something outside the normal service for me. The only thing I can think of is Craigslist. That way, I can hire someone and they can stay there then drive me home after the appointment. I’m afraid to tell my dentist’s office this because if they say no, I’m out of options and I may have to do it anyway. What are my choices? Thanks. Deidre

Deidre – Think about it this way… when you visit the sedation dentist, you’ll be given medications that will relax you. They won’t make you unconscious but will relax you so much that you’re not really concerned about an extraction. The medication doesn’t wear off right away. It can take a few hours before you feel like yourself and you’ll probably be drowsy for the rest of the day. Most people go home and sleep until the medication wears off.

Why Be Selective about Your Driver for a Sedation Dentistry Visit?

  • Craigslist can be a great service, but it can also be a dangerous one. You don’t really know who is responding to your inquiry until you meet them, and sometimes not even then. Unfortunately, while sedated, you probably still won’t care much what’s happening around you.
  • Would you entrust yourself to a stranger? Would you let a stranger take you inside your home? Probably not, and you shouldn’t.
  • One of the reasons you must have a trusted adult be your companion during and after these visits is that you’ll need someone to watch and care for you. Generally, offices worry about you stumbling at home, but if you’re with someone you don’t know, not only do you not know if they’re equipped to help you in a situation, you don’t if they are safe or if they will assist you.

Suggestions for Finding a Trustworthy Driver

  • Talk to your dentist’s office and see what they recommend. If they don’t have any ideas, check in with your church (if you have one) or any other community groups you belong to.
  • There are also community programs that sometimes offer transit and support as a service—sometimes even free.
  • Depending on your insurance, you may qualify to have a caregiver assist you for the day.

If those options are not available, you may want to consider hospital care or going without the sedative if the doctor approves. Obviously, having the tooth removed is a medical necessity. However, your doctor may be able to do other things to keep you comfortable or petition your insurance company for extra coverage based on medical necessity.

You have a  few options to consider, but Craigslist is a bad idea.

This blog is sponsored by Plano Sedation Dentist, Dr. Miranda Lacy.

Should I have to pay for sedation dentistry again?

In May I got a new partial denture and I think I’m going to have to go back under sedation to have it fixed. A metal clasp on the left side of my mouth is putting a lot of pressure on the next tooth. I thought that maybe it would loosen with time but it’s quite uncomfortable. Can this clasp be adjusted? If it can be, should I have to pay out of pocket for sedation dentistry? I’ve used all of my insurance allowance for sedation. I just can’t get through a dental appointment without it. If this is an issue my dentist is responsible for, shouldn’t she cover fixing the partial and waive the fee for sedation? – Patrick T.

Patrick,

Although partial dentures are made at a dental lab, most general dentists are able to loosen a clasp on the denture. Partial dentures are usually uncomfortable when you first receive them. The tight clasp might not necessarily be your dentist’s fault. Ask her to explain the reason for the discomfort.

Call your dentist to let her know your concern. If you’ve had the partial denture for longer than a month, she will want to promptly check it. A clasp that is too tight on a tooth for a long period can potentially damage the tooth.

Ask Your Dentist about Sedation

You should speak with your dentist about your need for sedation and ask if she is willing to waive the fee. You can also contact your insurance company, explain the circumstances, and ask for special consideration for any insurance claim that will be submitted for sedation fees.

Options for Replacing Missing Teeth

Dental implants are an option for permanently replacing teeth without the adjustment period or the discomfort of partial dentures.  But dental implants are a more expensive option, and your dentist must determine if you are a candidate for them. They have several advantages over a partial denture:

  • Surgically implanted in your jawbone
  • Stimulate bone growth and prevent shrinkage
  • Look and feel like your natural teeth
  • Don’t need to be secured to an adjacent tooth
  • More cost-effective in the long-term because they are permanent

If your budget permits, you can consider dental implants as an alternative in the future when you need a new partial denture.

We hope you have a successful outcome with adjusting your partial denture and getting assistance with the cost of sedation dentistry.

This blog is sponsored by Plano sedation dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.

Can I get sedation dentistry when I get my teeth whitened?

I’ve been putting off getting my teeth whitened because of the pain. I have two friends that got their teeth whitened and both of them said that it hurt. I am wondering if I can find a dentist who does sleep dentistry with teeth whitening. Thanks. Ethan

Ethan– Sedation dentistry, often referred to as sleep dentistry, is used during restorative dentistry. When you receive procedures such as a root canal treatment or a dental crown, sedation may be administered.

Generally, the process of whitening your teeth is not painful. The sensitivity in your teeth is felt after the whitening process, so sedation dentistry won’t help. Most of the sensitivity in your teeth is felt 24 to 48 hours after the whitening treatment. But if you need help relaxing, your dentist will provide some form of sedation to help.

Did your friends receive teeth whitening from a dentist, or did they use a do-it-yourself kit? There are several factors about teeth whitening that, when completed at home, can create sensitivity in your teeth.

You can have a consultation with a dentist for teeth whitening. Let him or her know your concerns about sensitivity in your teeth after whitening. A dentist can prescribe heavily fluoridated mouthwash or toothpaste that you can use for a period in advance of your appointment. It will help reduce the sensitivity after whitening.

This post is sponsored by Plano, TX female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.

How can I get my wife to stop requesting sedation at the dentist?

I’m afraid that my wife may be using sedation dentistry as a crutch. I don’t really blame her for wanting to have the meds, but it throws us into a bit of chaos every time she needs to have dental work done. Without going too much into detail, her childhood dentist was pretty brutal. He left her with an intense fear of the dentist. Her teeth looked fine when I met her, but as the years went by, they deteriorated quite a bit and she refused to see a dentist. We found a sedation dentist to help her and I will say that she has been a godsend. We made it through the series of appointments necessary to get her smiling again and life is good.

However, every time something comes up now- even if it’s a tiny cavity being filled- she asks for oral conscious sedation (OCS). We’ve got a good relationship with this doctor and my wife seems to trust her, but it’s hard for me to take the day off work just because my wife needs a filling. Plus, our insurance doesn’t cover it, so you know who’s paying for it- me. I don’t mean to sound insensitive, but it seems like this has gone on long enough. At some point, she should be able to go without the meds, right? At what point can I safely interrupt this trend and tell her to be mature about this?

Thank you,

Raymond

 

Dear Raymond,

This is a particularly interesting question with no definitive answer. However, we can explain what might be happening.

Any Kind of Trauma Can Leave Lasting Emotional Scars

We don’t know what happened specifically with your wife, but a trauma of any kind can have a lasting impact on a person. For example, a child who is ridiculed in school may begin to think that a school is a bad place where he or she does not belong. The child will associate learning with ridicule and have trouble excelling. A child who is beaten by a parent learns to avoid their parent and often avoids relationships later in life as a result. Some children never learn how to form close bonds with others.

A person who witnesses a violent event, such as a shooting, may also develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They can become hypervigilant and anxious and be unable to return to the place where the event happened. Or they might be constantly on alert waiting for it to happen again. These people can often muddle through life without treating the underlying problem, but their quality of life diminishes. For example, the bullied child may never finish school. The abused child may never have a healthy relationship. The crime witness may withdraw from the things he or she loves.

The Right Way to Address Trauma Varies

The field of mental health care is filled with many different methods to help people overcome trauma so they can live healthy and full lives. Arguably, the most well-known is talk therapy. There are also other avenues a licensed mental/ behavioral healthcare professional might try, such as Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), coaching, and teaching the person healthy coping mechanisms. We don’t know the level of distress you wife feels or how deep it goes, so it’s difficult to say what type of therapy she needs.

A Sedation Dentist Can Help Reduce Anxiety, Now and Forever

For some, dental anxiety doesn’t go away without some kind of care from a mental health specialist. Choosing OCS or a similar variant is a crutch in some cases, but if it empowers them to get the care they need, it’s worthwhile. For others, the extra care afforded by a sedation dentist lets them build positive memories with their dental care team. In time, with lots of positive experiences, your wife’s prior experiences may diminish so much that she sees the treatment as a positive and enjoyable thing. However, all this is probably happening in her subconscious. Even if she trusts her doctor and knows the office is safe, she’s already been conditioned to be fearful. There is no timeline or formula that flips a switch and allows her to not have anxiety.

In short, there is no right time to take control and insist your wife has dental appointments without sedation. She’s not doing anything wrong and if she’s anxious, she’s likely unable to control it. While there is no harm in having an open discussion with her about how she feels about treatment without the medication, it’s best not to insist on it. If anxiety seeps into other areas of her life, it may be worthwhile for her to talk to a mental health professional and start dealing with some of the underlying causes. If it’s purely dental anxiety, please respect it. Your support will make a world of difference in her confidence and willingness to continue with getting treatment.

 

This blog is sponsored by Plano sedation dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.

Will sedation dentistry legislation require insurance companies to provide more benefits?

My sister lives in California and has been raving because she says there’s a law there requiring insurance companies to cover sedation dentistry. She and I both had terrible experiences as children and don’t do well for any kind of dental procedure unless we have some kind of medication to get us through. This is big news because we’ve always had to pay out-of-pocket for it, and we don’t have the best teeth. I’ve looked and looked, but I don’t see anything that discusses this law- either as something in place or upcoming. Any news?

Thanks, Emilia

 

Dear Emilia,

Head and shoulders photo of a man and woman lying in a field of flowers, for information on sedation dentistry from Plano TX dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.California has some incredibly progressive laws in many respects. Many regulations originate in California before they are adopted in other states. California Assembly Bill 2643 amends Section 1367.1 of the Health and Safety Code and Section 10119.9. SB 2643. It outlines a number of regulations that have to do with “the use of general anesthesia, conscious sedation, and oral conscious sedation (OCS) for pediatric and adult patients.”

  • The current language of the laws stipulates that dental anesthesia only has mandatory coverage in a hospital setting. As you probably know, there are many people who genuinely require anesthesia, but don’t need to go to a hospital for treatment.
  • The proposed legislation would force new insurance plans to cover it effective January 2019.
  • The proposed law is being sponsored by the California Dental Association and California Society of Pediatric Dentistry. It is not yet approved. If passed, it could make a major difference for people like your sister who lives in California.

Sedation Dentistry and Insurance

Throughout the rest of the country, coverage for any form of anesthesia or OCS varies based on the insurance policy. While most insurance companies recognize that OCS makes it possible for many people to receive treatment,  manage their oral health better, and possibly reduce expenses for insurance companies overall,  most insurance companies are reluctant to add sedation dentistry as a necessary and valuable benefit.

It sounds as if you’ve personally made your oral health a priority and have found a way to budget for it, which is commendable. Patients who are still trying to find a way to manage dental anxiety and get necessary treatment may be able to find a plan that specifically covers OCS. It is worth noting that very few offer coverage and when they do, it can be costly.

As an alternative, it’s helpful to speak with your dentist about what your anxiety and finding affordable dental treatment. Most dentists will work with you to overcome the issues, perhaps by doing as much work as possible in a single appointment or doing the work in phases. Your dentist may have additional solutions.

This blog is sponsored by Plano sedation dentist, Dr. Miranda Lacy.

Pain and sensitivity after sedation dentist filled 2 teeth

Last week I saw a sedation dentist and got 2 teeth filled. It was so hard for me to keep a dental appointment because of my anxiety. After learning about sedation dentistry, it gave me the courage to do something about my teeth. My understanding from the Internet is that sedation helps you relax and it makes the pain less intense. I received the fillings because I thought they would fix the pain and sensitivity in my teeth, not cause more of it. The pain and sensitivity haven’t gone away and this is a huge disappointment. What’s going on? Am I going to need to have the fillings redone? Bahja

Bahja – Sedation dentistry does relax you and decrease the pain during a dental procedure. Sensitivity and pain after a tooth filling are normal. For the first 24 hours after having cavities filled, you should avoid hard or sticky foods that can irritate your teeth or cause the filling to dislodge.

Sedation dentistry can make getting cavities filled easier

As the nerves in your teeth calm down, sensitivity should gradually diminish. You will find that foods or drinks that are hot or cold will increase sensitivity in your teeth. If you had deep tooth decay that might have been close to a nerve, it is not unusual to feel pain and increased sensitivity, and it can take up to four weeks for the sensitivity to go away.

If you notice that you have pain only while you are chewing, it is possible that the fillings in your teeth are too high. Another indication that a filling is too high is that it will prevent the biting surfaces of your teeth from closing together. If you are experiencing either of these issues contact your sedation dentist’s office.

This post is sponsored by Plano female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.

Why can’t I get sedation dentistry for a root canal?

I’m wondering why I can’t get sedation dentistry for a root canal. 2 of my bottom left molars have really been hurting me. Unfortunately, I put off the dental appointment so long that I can’t chew on that side of my mouth without intense pain. Last Thursday, I had a dental appointment and the dentist told me that I now need root canals and crowns for both teeth. If I had gone to the dentist earlier, the situation wouldn’t be so bad. I was expecting the dentist to say that I only need fillings. I asked to be sedated for the procedure, but this dentist told me that he doesn’t do sedation because he is gentle and none of his patients need sedation, especially for something as simple as a root canal. My level of fear is so high that the thought of going to a dentist for a root canal is making me nauseous. Am I asking for too much? Why can’t I get sedation dentistry for a root canal? Daniel

Head and shoulders photo of a man and woman lying in a field of flowers, for information on sedation dentistry from Plano TX dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy.Daniel – A gentle dentist is able to give you root canal treatment that is painless. But if your anxiety level is high, sedation dentistry can help keep you calm. Even dental fillings or cleanings can be performed with sedation.

The important thing is not to skip the root canal treatment. When the pulp, or soft tissue, inside your tooth is infected, the infection must be removed. Otherwise, the damaged pulp will cause nerve irritation and pain. At some point, the pulp in the tooth will die, and you won’t feel pain anymore. But your tooth will still be infected, and the infection can spread to the bone and to other teeth.

What Happens During Root Canal Treatment?

  • Your dentist will make an opening on the biting surface of the tooth. Dental tools will be used to clean out the tooth, down to the roots.
  • The pulp will be replaced with a dental filler material. The roots of the tooth will be sealed with a dental adhesive.
  • A temporary filling or a temporary crown will be placed over your tooth.
  • Your tooth will be shaved to allow the permanent crown to fit over it. Usually, permanent crowns are custom made in a dental lab.

Sedation Dentistry Will Help During Root Canal Treatment

Sedation dentistry is helpful during root canal treatment. In addition to helping you stay calm, it will decrease your sensitivity to pain. If your dentist is unwilling to provide some form of sedation, you can schedule consultations with at least two other dentists who will provide it.

Depending on the dentist, you will learn about three different levels of sedation:

  • Nitrous oxide – This colorless, odorless gas is often referred to as laughing gas. You’ll breathe it in during the appointment. When the procedure is complete, you’ll be given pure oxygen to reverse the effects.
  • Oral conscious sedation – In advance of your appointment, you will take commonly prescribed anti-anxiety medication. You’ll come to the office relaxed and ready for your root canal treatment.
  • IV sedation – Anti-anxiety medication is given to you intravenously.

For each consultation, ask the dentist what types of sedation he or she offers. Ask about safety precautions while you are sedated. You can find a sedation dentist by asking friends, family members, or coworkers for recommendations. Also, you can search online for a dentist near you. Be sure to check patient reviews.

Act promptly to prevent your infected molars from causing more problems in your bone or adjacent teeth.

This post is provided by Plano, TX female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy. Dr. Lacy’s office is convenient to Addison, Allen, Carrollton, Farmers Branch, Frisco, Garland, Highland Park, and Little Elm.

Afraid of being sedated by a new dentist but I need 2 crowns

I know that sedation dentistry is probably the best thing for me, but my current dentist doesn’t offer it. I just can’t relax in her office. It’s not her. It’s me.

I have to switch dentists because she doesn’t offer sedation. I need 2 new crowns and I’ve put it off for too long. Now there is a problem of letting a complete stranger sedate me. It’s part of my fear and I know that I am going to have to get over it. There has to be a first time.

What can I do to get over the fear of having a new dentist sedate me? I don’t want to go into the office and make a fool of myself because of my fear. Thank. L.E.

L.E.

Sedation dentists are used to seeing fearful patients, so don’t worry how your anxiety will be perceived by the dentist or their staff. Your anxiety is common among millions of Americans.

How to Choose a Sedation Dentist

  • Before you choose a new sedation dentist, have consultations with a few dentists who have been recommended by friends or family members, or with whom you think you may be comfortable.
  • Speak with each dentist about your fears. Find out what he or she does to help anxious patients relax and what levels of sedation are offered.
  • Meet the staff, take an office tour, and become familiar with the office.
  • After you have chosen a dentist, if you are still very uncomfortable, continue to ask questions and talk about your concerns until you feel comfortable. Don’t proceed with getting dental crowns before you are comfortable.

Receiving sedation will be easier if the dentist is no longer a stranger to you and you know what will be done to help you relax and have a pain-free experience.

This post is sponsored by Plano female dentist Dr. Miranda Lacy. Dr. Lacy’s office is convenient to Addison, Allen, Carrollton, Farmers Branch, Frisco, Garland, Highland Park, and Little Elm.